Family: Frederick Outerbridge meets his brother Lionel’s daughter Caroline Woodley and Leon’s child Lois Outerbridge-Bean. *Photo by Sirkka Huish
Family: Frederick Outerbridge meets his brother Lionel’s daughter Caroline Woodley and Leon’s child Lois Outerbridge-Bean. *Photo by Sirkka Huish

Frederick Outerbridge grew up repeatedly hearing the words “look at the little triplets”.

As the only surviving member of Bermuda’s first triplets, the 83-year-old has fond members of growing up “feeling like he was ­special”.

Mr. Outerbridge said ­people would constantly stop him and brothers ­Lionel and Leon in the street “to see how much we’d grown”.

He visited Bermuda from the United States this week, saying he had fond memories of a “wonderful childhood”.

Mischief

As youngsters, the three boys would go everywhere together “like peas and rice”.

Mr. Outerbridge said: “I remember growing up as one of three.

“There was ­always someone to play with.

“We all got along as brothers. We got up to some mischief but in those days children were good, you had to be good.

“Bermuda was a beautiful place to grow up. People would always ­remember us. They’d stop in the street and say, ‘Oh my, look at the little triplets’.”

The three boys were born at a house on North Shore Road on June 10, 1927, to parents Rebecca Outerbridge and Herman ­Minors.

The boys were “quite the surprise” as the couple had no idea they were expecting triplets. Mr. Outerbridge, who was the eldest and tallest of the three, said: “My parents just made do and coped whatever way they could.

“I remember feeling ­special when I was younger but I’ve never shown off about being a triplet.Now I don’t feel that ­special, I’m just normal.”

Mr. Outerbridge grew up in Pembroke, going to school at Northlands and West Pembroke.

He went on to work as a handyman at Cloverleaf Restaurant at Walker ­Arcade, Hamilton. He moved to Boston when he was in his 20s, while his two brothers remained in Bermuda with his parents.

He never got married and never had children, saying: “That is not for everyone.”

Mr. Outerbridge, who now lives in Palm Beach, regularly returns to Bermuda, saying: “Things have really changed, everything looks different these days.”

He visited the island ­earlier this week as a ­passenger on the cruise ­liner, the ­Norwegian Spirit.

The ship was docked at King’s Wharf from Sunday to Tuesday.

Mr. Outerbridge managed to get together with several family members, including his nieces — the daughters of his brothers Lionel and Leon, who both died at the end of 2005.

Lois Outerbridge-Bean, Leon’s daughter, said: “As boys they used to love cricket and people would ­always get them mixed up.

“It took me a while to learn to tell them apart.”

Genes

Caroline Woodley, the daughter of Lionel, who was known as Toby, said: “Dad always talked about being a triplet.

“I think they probably got up to some things together — boys will be boys!”

The Outerbridge family has welcomed a couple of sets of twins over the years but there has been no sign of any more triplets.

Ms Woodley joked: “We think triplets could still be in the genes so that’s why I stopped at one daughter, just in case.”