Career highlight: Bermudian jazz singer Gita Blakeney-Saltus fulfils her dream of ­performing to the legendary musician and producer Quincy Jones.
Career highlight: Bermudian jazz singer Gita Blakeney-Saltus fulfils her dream of ­performing to the legendary musician and producer Quincy Jones.
Many who braved the strong wind at Friday night's Music Festival were left confused and disappointed that they were on their home by 10:10pm.

The show finished rather abruptly after legendary country singer Kenny Rogers sang his third song, Island In The Stream, and then left the stage telling the audience he would be back.

They could be forgiven for thinking he was just taking a short break. The orchestra ­appeared to be awaiting ­instructions as Mr. Rogers talked in the wings. Eventually, all of the Music Festival's major artists came on stage - Patti Austin, James ­Ingram, Michael McDonald, Quincy Jones and ­Kenny Rogers and launched into a rendition of We Are The World, which lasted for several minutes. But this was no seamless transition to the final ­number and although well received, did not quite ­compensate for the brevity of the show.

There was no doubting the talent of the international cast that Quincy Jones had gathered. Grammy award winner Patti Austin gave a polished ­performance and delighted the audience with her ­rendition of Home, from the Broadway show, The Wiz.

James Ingram showed his versatility and was a great hit with the audience. They loved his Just Once and his duet number with Patti Austin How Do You Keep The Music Playing from the movie Best Friends.

Gita Blakeney-Saltus, Bermuda's internationally acclaimed jazz singer, more than held her own in this ­illustrious company when she sang to Quincy Jones.

Michael McDonald ­displayed his distinctive and powerful soulful voice, along with his talent for phrasing and interpretation of lyrics.

Throughout the evening the Quincy Jones Orchestra defied the wind and gave excellent backing to the singers showing why they are a world-renowned orchestra by producing an incredible sound.

The entertainment was good - there just wasn't enough of it, especially as the minimum ticket price was $110.

Perhaps the format of this type of show needs to be revised. Having each artist perform only three or four numbers leaves the ­audience just wanting more.

And those who came ­because Kenny Rogers was performing and who were prepared to make ­allowances for his bad cold when he sang Lady and The Gambler, could feel more aggrieved than most that they had been short-changed at this Music ­Festival night.