Bermudian experience: Students from the SS Sorlandet learned how to make kites.  *Photo by Raymond Hainey
Bermudian experience: Students from the SS Sorlandet learned how to make kites. *Photo by Raymond Hainey

The student crew of the world’s oldest working full-rigged tall ship left Bermuda on Friday after a whirlwind tour of the island.

A total of 48 students, seven teachers and 11 professional sailors spent three days in Hamilton after a marathon nine-month globe-trotting trip on the SS Sorlandet which mixed school studies with travel as part of the Class Afloat programme.

Ryan Morstad, 18, from Calgary, said: “This is my first time in Bermuda and I love it — it’s so colourful.

“It’s got some really nice beaches and really nice people.”

The ship started off in Turkey in September and visited Europe, Africa, South America and the islands of the South Atlantic, including St Helena and the Ascension Islands, before stopping off in the Caribbean and making a final stop in Bermuda before returning to Nova Scotia.

Mr Morstad said: “I’ve loved it    it’s been awesome. It’s great to learn how to sail a tall ship like this.”

While on the island, the students, from the West Island College International-run programme, made traditional Bermuda kites at Albuoy’s Point and later flew them at Horseshoe Bay to celebrate Bermuda Day.

They also visited historic St George’s, the nearby Crystal Caves and attended the Harbour Nights party in Hamilton.

In addition, the students held a prom party on board last Wednesday.

And they visited Saltus Grammar School to talk to pupils about their experiences.

Mr Morstad, who plans to go to university in Vancouver later this year to study sciences, added: “The entire trip has been great.

“It’s much better than ordinary school and I feel you learn more. Things you get taught in class, you actually go and see.

“Reading about it in books is one thing, but actually seeing it for yourself makes you realise what they really are.”