Days gone by: This photograph is believed to be from the 1890s where three teenage boys collect seaweed. *Photo supplied
Days gone by: This photograph is believed to be from the 1890s where three teenage boys collect seaweed. *Photo supplied

A unique old photograph that has just been donated to the National Museum has got staff scratching their heads.

The image, which is believed to date back to the 1890s, shows three teenage boys raking and collecting Sargasso seaweed from a beach.

But the exact location from where the eye-catching black and white picture was taken has sparked a wide range of views.

Experts believe it to be Tucker’s Point Beach, but islanders have suggested other venues including Elbow Beach, Grape Bay and Church Bay.

Curator Elena Strong told the Bermuda Sun: “Judging by the other photographs in the collection, the image is late 19th century.

“The three teenage boys are raking and collecting Sargasso seaweed to be used as a natural fertilizer as it contains nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

“It was used in large quantities on local farms.

“The National Museum of Bermuda curatorial department believes that the beach is likely to be Tucker’s Point Beach but further investigation needs to conducted.”

The photograph is part of a large collection of images that have just been donated to the National Museum.

The pictures, which came from the estate of a relative of JJ Outerbridge, will join the museum’s collection of historic Bermuda photographs.

Ms Strong added: “The collection of photos are held in trust by the Museum to preserve for future generations.

“The original photograph can not go on permanent display due to light sensitivity but it has been digitized for public access and will be used in future Museum publications, education material and exhibits.