Bud tender Amber Peters, left, describes the different attributes of various strains of marijuana to chef David Temple at the Northern Lights Cannabis Co. *MCT Photo
Bud tender Amber Peters, left, describes the different attributes of various strains of marijuana to chef David Temple at the Northern Lights Cannabis Co. *MCT Photo

It’s unclear whether any significant overhaul to the Bermuda marijuana laws would cause an uptick in tourism to Bermuda.

The Cannabis Reform Collaborative (CRC) says it has discussed the possible effect legalization would have on that industry on the island, but no consensus was reached.

The CRC broached the topic with the newly formed Bermuda Tourism Authority, but received no formal response about the topic from that entity.

The authority declined to comment for this story.

In Colorado, where recreational marijuana has been legal since the New Year, there is an ongoing debate over how much effect the recent legalization of the drug has had and will have on that state’s tourism industry. Tourism is up from past years, according to various media outlets, but some say that has more to do with a recovering US economy and an excellent ski season than the availability of weed.

Still, there are those who are anticipating an uptick in tourism in Colorado because of the legality of the drug. Weed tourism does appear to be carving its own niche, with marijuana- themed vacation outings, which can include, according to USA Today, a cooking-with-cannabis class, visits to dispensaries and a grow facility.

Marijuana-themed tours and outings can range anywhere between a few hundreds to thousands of dollars.

Those skeptical of the tourism ripple effect point out smoking marijuana in public places is still banned in Colorado and most hotels are not allowing smoking on the premises.

“I don’t know where a person who came to smoke marijuana would smoke it, unless they’re in somebody’s private home,” Denver City council president Mary Beth Susman was quoted as saying in the Mid Columbia Tri City Herald. “Hotels are banning it. We’ve banned even displaying it on the 16th Street Mall (a downtown promenade) and in our parks.” Meanwhile, here in Bermuda, the CRC has pushed back the date when it will submit its recommendations to government by about two weeks.

Experts It will now submit its report to government on April 17. The group has hosted a community meeting that featured experts in law enforcement, addiction treatment and prevention and medicinal cannabis.

CRC is almost done gathering public input; anyone who would like to submit written input can do so by emailing bda.crc@gmail.

com by 5pm on March 25.

The CRC’s survey about prospective cannabis reform has garnered more than 1,000 responses from Bermuda residents. The results of that survey have yet to be released to the public, but the CRC plans on including information culled from responses in its report to the government.

Residents also have until 5pm on March 25 to complete that survey, which can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/3YCZRNT The survey asks demographic questions, questions about personal marijuana use and prospective medical marijuana and decriminalization and legalization cannabis reform ideas. n