More than two thirds of voters disagree with the decision to bring the Guantanamo refugees to Bermuda, according to a new poll.

Sixty-nine per cent of people asked said they were not in favour of the move, while 22 per cent said they were in favour. Nine per cent said they were not sure.

However, many of those who were not in favour also stressed they do not mind the men being here; they only object to the politics behind the decision.

Premier Ewart Brown has earned censure from Britain, China and his own Cabinet for signing a deal with the States behind the back of London and even his own ministers. Thousands of people have marched on Parliament to protest what they say is Dr. Brown's autocratic style of leadership.

The poll, conducted by Profiles of Bermuda, found that females were somewhat more likely than males to disapprove of the decision (71 per cent to 67 per cent). Whites (85 per cent) were more likely to disapprove than blacks (61 per cent) and UBP supporters (87 per cent) were more likely to disapprove than those who voted PLP in the last election (56 per cent). A total of 401 registered voters were surveyed for the poll, which had a margin of error of 5 per cent.

In a separate, unscientific poll, conducted on the Bermuda Sun's website, 64 per cent of readers said the four refugees should be allowed to stay, while 21 per cent said they should be made to leave. A further 14 per cent said they should be allowed to stay, but without citizenship rights.