Wet and wild ride: The Oleander’s deck and containers are swept by waves as she crossed the Atlantic. *Photo supplied
Wet and wild ride: The Oleander’s deck and containers are swept by waves as she crossed the Atlantic. *Photo supplied

If you thought transporting hundreds of containers across the Atlantic every week to Bermuda was an easy, uneventful task — think again.

Last week the Oleander was smashed with 70-knot winds and 26-foot waves as she sailed back to New York to reload.

The ship and her crew battled through appalling weather conditions that saw the vessel rolling up to 40 degrees from side to side.

Despite being battered by torrential rain and high seas they managed to maintain a speed of 9 knots and remain on schedule and ensure foods and supplies made it back to Bermuda in time.

Captain Jacek Jurszo, and his crew’s efforts prompted the ships’ owners, Bermuda Container Line, to recognize their ‘outstanding dedication and seamanship’.

A spokesman said: “Whilst this type of weather is routine for the Oleander during the winter months no doubt BCL’s customers and all the people of Bermuda will join us in thanking the captain and crew of the Oleander for the commitment they make week after week to ensure a reliable supply of goods to our Island.”

The Oleander returned to Bermuda on Monday after a slightly less treacherous journey across the Atlantic.

Meanwhile one of our other container ships, Somers Isles, has been hit by some pretty rough weather. She is due to arrive in Hamilton tomorrow — a day behind schedule.

And the Bermuda Islander has cancelled her trip this week because she had fallen so far behind schedule — again due to the weather. She is back on her normal Thursday morning arrival slot next week.

The tanker Nord Princess is expected to arrive at the Oil Docks in St George’s on Friday with fuel for BELCO.

While on Saturday the tanker, Buddy, is expected to get into the Oil Docks with fuel for Esso.