* Photo by Alex Masters. Triple winner: Ashley Yearwood set a new personal best and won a bronze medal in the 50-metre backstroke on Thursday. Here she’s seen competing earlier in the week. She helped Bermuda win bronze in both the 4 x 50 and 4 x 100 freestyle relays.
* Photo by Alex Masters. Triple winner: Ashley Yearwood set a new personal best and won a bronze medal in the 50-metre backstroke on Thursday. Here she’s seen competing earlier in the week. She helped Bermuda win bronze in both the 4 x 50 and 4 x 100 freestyle relays.
Ashley Yearwood picked up a bronze medal of the Island Games with her third place finish in the 50-metre backstroke. Yearwood, 14, clocked 31.33 - her personal best, missing out on the silver with by 0.09 seconds.

It was her third bronze of the Games as she teamed with sister Nicole, Morgan Hopkins and Rebecca Heyliger to podium finishes in the women's 4 x 50 and 4 x 100 freestyle relays.

"It was amazing," Ashley said. "I didn't really expect to get an individual medal in this meet. I was really surprised and happy. I feel really good about it."

Ashley was overcome with emotion in the fact that she won three medals.

"There are no words that can describe it. I'm like super happy."

Coach Richard Godwin was delighted with the results of the teenaged girls.

Hey said of Ashley's performance: "Any time you do a 50 it has to be very technical and that was a very technical swim. She was probably giving away eight to nine inches in height to the other competitors so everything had to be absolutely perfect and for her it was."

"I'm exceptionally pleased, particularly on the girls relay teams. We've had two bronze medals and I couldn't ask anything more from them."

He said the Bermuda Amateur Swimming Association views the Island Games as a highly important developmental meet. We are taking the next crop of potential senior games people and exposing them to a lower level international affair so they get the concept of the bigger picture. This concept has worked very well for us. The last Island Games at Rhodes we developed three people - Nick Thomson, Rebecca Sharpe and Julian Fletcher - and two years later they are now going to the big show, which is the World Championships."

He said one of the benefits was the atmosphere created at the meet.

"The intenseness of the competition is certainly there. The competition here is on an equal footing or potentially an equal footing and it is a very intense competition.

"Everyone in the finals is out there to score. The girls gave their everything in the finals in this competition.

"They go at it hammer and tongs for their own prestige and their own honour, their country, their island, their team."