Tumaini Steede, left, died in a bike crash last year. He and Nahki Wells, right, were friends and the Bradford City player plans a tribute when he plays at Wembley on Sunday. *Right, file photo by Ras Mykkal; left, AFP photo
Tumaini Steede, left, died in a bike crash last year. He and Nahki Wells, right, were friends and the Bradford City player plans a tribute when he plays at Wembley on Sunday. *Right, file photo by Ras Mykkal; left, AFP photo

Nahki Wells is no longer just a big name in Bermuda.

The 22-year-old striker was all over the British national press on the eve of the biggest game of his career — the Capital One Cup final against Swansea at Wembley where, incidentally, there were specks of snow yesterday.

The striker, like on the pitch, was not slow in coming forward either predicting he was “destined for greatness”.

Wells also said he had a special tribute planned tomorrow to honour his late friend Tumaini Steede, who died in a bike crash on the island.

Steede and Wells played age group football for Bermuda and, after scoring against Aston Villa in the semi-final, the front man revealed a ‘RIP Tumaini Steede’ T-shirt in honour of his mate.

Mates

Wells said: “He was a very tight mate of mine growing up. We played together from 12 years old, internationally for Bermuda through the age ranks, and he was my strike partner for the youth national teams growing up.

"Against Villa, I felt I had to pay respects because there was a chance he would have been at that game. He would have come up because he was studying in Brighton. He just went back [to Bermuda] for the summer and, had he not passed away, he would probably have had a similar opportunity to me because he was so talented.

“What happened totally inspires me to achieve what I have always wanted to achieve, but also do it with him in mind because he was destined for something similar and unfortunately he didn’t get his opportunity.

“When Tumaini died, it was a hard moment for me and I’ve just totally put my career towards [honouring] him. His parents gave me a call after I scored in the Villa game. They were proud of me and happy that I gave their son a shout-out.

"I do have something planned [for Tumaini] at Wembley, but I’ll save that for Sunday.”

Self-belief

The former Dandy Town Hornets man, who hails from Devonshire, has a humble side — but he does not lack self-belief.

That has been on show, in particular, when League Two Bradford toppled Premier League opposition Arsenal and Villa en route to Wembley.

And he believes he has everything needed to grace the highest level of English football.

He said: “As funny as it sounds, I feel so much more comfortable playing against Premier League sides than League Two teams,” Wells said. “Premier League teams allow you to have the ball and, if you have the ability, you can affect them, especially with pace and skill.

“I personally found it a lot easier playing against Villa than some League Two teams. You reap some of the headlines when you are a striker scoring goals, but hopefully people look at me as someone who is destined for greatness because I know I am.

“I’m the only one who can hold myself back. If I really want it, I have the capability of reaching those goals. My dream is to play at the highest level. I think I can play in the Premier League. If given the opportunity, I have no doubts that I can do it.

“I was always a Man United fan as a kid and Wayne Rooney has always been my favourite player. If I’m lucky enough to play against him or with him one day, that would be great. I’m not being cocky or big headed. I just know how hard the opportunity is to come by and how quickly it can go.”