That was then: Prior to its development for tourism, Tucker’s Town consisted mostly of farmland. Inset; Reginald Burrows. *File photos
That was then: Prior to its development for tourism, Tucker’s Town consisted mostly of farmland. Inset; Reginald Burrows. *File photos

The row over an inquiry into how Bermudians were displaced from their land has focused on Tucker’s Town — but the practice was islandwide. But for Reginald Burrows, whose family once worked the land in Tucker’s Town, the Governor’s decision to reject a motion for a Commission of Inquiry did not reignite a burning sense of great injustice.

Mr Burrows told the Sun he had really not given a lot of thought to what happened nearly 100 years ago in light of the recent developments that culminated in a march on Government House last night. The former PLP MP said that because his family was compensated after they left Tucker’s Town, he was more concerned for those Bermudians who lost land and were never compensated.

Mr Burrows said: “My family links with Tucker’s Town go back three generations. My great uncle Joseph De Rosa and my great grandfather Profiro Gomez both worked on the land there. One worked as a sailor while the other was a whaler.

“And they had to leave their homes when they were forced out.”

Mr Burrows added: “But I really have not given it a lot of thought lately —  this is something that happened 100 years ago.

“As far as I am concerned, my family were compensated for what they gave up and they did not mind leaving. I never heard any of them complain about having to move. They seemed quite satisfied with the compensation they received.

“But the issue is that this kind of thing happened all over Bermuda and there are people in areas of Paget and Southampton and other parts of Bermuda who never received compensation. I am more concerned about that than my family having to move from Tucker’s Town.”

Meanwhile, historian and National Museum Director Dr Edward Harris suggested that an islandwide inquiry should be conducted by scholars rather than any other more costly means.

He said: “This is a subject that should be studied throughout Bermuda from Ireland Island through to the bases at the other end.

“A tremendous amount of research needs to be done in this area and I believe it would be more efficient if it was done by a couple of PhD students.

“It would not be a quick process, but it would be worthwhile so we can understand better what happened and why from a historical perspective.”