Be smart: Use a secondary lock and never park in an unlit area, says Sgt Dorian Astwood of the Roads Policing Unit. *Photo by Lamone Woods, Crimson Multimedia
Be smart: Use a secondary lock and never park in an unlit area, says Sgt Dorian Astwood of the Roads Policing Unit. *Photo by Lamone Woods, Crimson Multimedia
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What are thieves using to take bikes? YOUR keys!

Bike owners are making it too easy for thieves — by leaving their keys in their vehicles. It’s especially apparent in the central parishes, where most of the 197 bike thefts so far this year have taken place. 

Inspector Robert Cardwell of the Roads Policing Unit of the Bermuda Police Service told the Sun that “we are suffering a stolen cycle crisis.

“...One of the trends we see in these particular areas is that people are leaving their keys in the ignition or in the basket. Somebody who is of the mind to steal a motorcycle, obviously, they seize the opportunity. It’s an opportunistic crime.” 




Bike theft in the central parishes of Bermuda are primarily due to riders leaving their keys with their cycles.

This is according to Inspector Robert Cardwell of the Roads Policing Unit of the Bermuda Police Service. And with the number of cycle thefts at almost 200 for this year, the trend doesn’t look like it will stop anytime soon.

Last week, police revealed cycle theft had turned into an “organized enterprise” with groups targeting bikes and moving them with trucks. The number of bikes thefts has risen and on average, two cycle thefts are reported every single day.

Inspector Cardwell said: “Right now, we are suffering a stolen cycle crisis. We have seen a certain increase in incidents of cycle thefts.

“The legal term is taken without consent.

“So far this year, there have been 197 cycle theft reports with 107 stolen from central parishes, 26 from eastern parishes and 64 from western parishes.”

And of the 197 reported stolen, only 62 have been recovered.

Asked about the kinds of cycles that are targeted, Insp Cardwell said Honda Scoopy, Leggero, Symax HD, Yamaha Nouvo and Aprilla Sports City.

“We have seen in the central area that City Hall Car Park, Par-la-Ville Car Park and Front Street parking lots have a high number of stolen vehicles.

“One of the trends that we see in these particular areas is that people are leaving their keys in the ignition or in the basket.

“Somebody who is of the mind to steal a motorcycle, obviously, they seize the opportunity. It’s an opportunistic crime.”

He continued: “We ask people that are parking their vehicle, if you see someone has left their keys in the cycle, secure the keys. Write down the registration number of the bike and call the police. Bring us the keys and we will contact that person.”

Asked how many bikes are stolen with keys left behind, Insp Cardwell said: “We suspect it’s a lot. People generally don’t tell us they have left their keys behind.

“The only way we find out is when we recover the bike with the keys. That information is generally not offered up.”

Asked for tips in securing your bike, Insp Cardwell said: “Things that can be done to prevent or make it more difficult for your bike to be stolen is the use of a secondary lock.

“Leaving your vehicle in a well-lit area and being sure to use a secondary lock will certainly cause deterrence.”

Asked what happens to most stolen bikes, he said: “There are several dump spots that are regularly used — public docks, cliff edges — and we mount operations to recover these vehicles. We see vehicles being used for specific parts. So while they steal the vehicle and use the parts, they damage the rest of the bike.

“It could be for the seat, the mirrors or as simple as tyres.” 

Anyone with information about stolen cycles should contact the Bermuda Police Service on 295-0011.